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HEALTH TIPS: Like to hear a story?

Posted on : 30-05-2009 | By : Health Promotion | In : Health Tips

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Health Tip – Audio Version speaker iconLike to hear a story?
Health Tip – Healthy Next StepDivision of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention (Indian Health Service)

“A young Indian boy named Rain that Dances lived in a small Indian village.’’

And he does, in the Eagle Books by Georgia Perez – picture books supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Indian Health Service and tribal leaders concerned about preventing diabetes for future generations.

“The lessons of the wise animals, who really represent the wisdom of tribal leaders, can remind children of traditional ways to grow strong.’’

“Going back to some of the traditions, such as the food their ancestors used to eat, becoming active once again, and passing those traditions on to their children, are important.’’

The stories are also available from CDC as podcasts.

Health Tip courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Last revised: September, 23 2008

HEALTH TIPS: Killer clot

Posted on : 30-05-2009 | By : Health Promotion | In : Health Tips

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Health Tip – Audio Version speaker iconKiller clot
Health Tip – Healthy Next StepThe Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism (U.S. Surgeon General)

A blood clot that starts in a deep vein, like you have in your legs, can break loose, travel to your lungs, block an artery, and maybe kill you.

The clot is called a deep vein thrombosis. When it reaches a lung, it can be a pulmonary embolism. And they contribute to about 100,000 deaths a year.

Too few people know about that, so Acting Surgeon Steven Galson has issued The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism.

“We’re not talking about Olympic-level athleticism here; we’re talking about taking a walk, a run, a bike – anything that promotes physical activity.’’

Health Tip courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Last revised: September, 24 2008

HEALTH TIPS: Breast cancer and breastfeeding

Posted on : 29-05-2009 | By : Health Promotion | In : Health Tips

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Health Tip – Audio Version speaker iconBreast cancer and breastfeeding
Health Tip – Healthy Next StepBreast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®) (National Cancer Institute)

There’s a lot about breast cancer risk, such as their family history, that women can’t control. But they can do some things, and a study says breastfeeding is among them.

Amanda Phipps of Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center examined data on breastfeeding and risks of some types of cancer. Her study in the journal Cancer was supported by the National Institutes of Health.

“Women who’d breastfed for at least six months in their lifetime were much less likely to develop breast cancer than mothers who had never breastfed.’’

For the most common forms – which are less aggressive – the risk reduction was about 20 percent. For one less common but more aggressive form, the reduction was about 50 percent.

Phipps sees benefits in breastfeeding. So she recommends women go with what works.

Health Tip courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Last revised: September, 25 2008

HEALTH TIPS: Heading toward heart trouble

Posted on : 29-05-2009 | By : Health Promotion | In : Health Tips

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Health Tip – Audio Version speaker iconHeading toward heart trouble
Health Tip – Healthy Next StepTake Charge of Your Health! (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)

Teenage boys might have signs of the heart trouble they could have as men. Researcher Antoinette Moran of the University of Minnesota Children’s Hospital found indications of that.

Moran looked at blood pressure, forms of cholesterol and problems with insulin in boys and girls from ages 11 to 19. She found male teens were more likely than females to have things worse.

“By the end of puberty, there was a pattern that these young men were moving in a direction that was of greater risk than the women.’’

Moran also says, though, that obesity could make things far worse in boys and girls. So she recommends weight control and exercise – which also works against blood pressure, cholesterol and insulin problems.

The study in the journal Circulation was supported by the National Institutes of Health.

Health Tip courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Last revised: September, 26 2008

HEALTH TIPS: Go for the record

Posted on : 28-05-2009 | By : Health Promotion | In : Health Tips

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Health Tip – Audio Version speaker iconGo for the record
Health Tip – Healthy Next StepSeasonal Flu (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

A new flu season is heading toward us, and flu-fighters want more people to be ready. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, want 30 million more people to be vaccinated, to reach a record 261 million people.

This includes more children and teens. The new recommendations cover ages six months to the 19th birthday. Of course, adults need vaccinations, too.

“It’s important to remember that, of all the people in the population, those that are most likely to get influenza are those in the school-aged group.’’

And they can spread the flu to family members, miss school or day care – and, although it’s rare, develop very serious complications.

Jernigan also says this season’s flu vaccine is well-targeted to the expected flu season strains.

Health Tip courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Last revised: September, 29 2008

HEALTH TIPS: Big shots

Posted on : 28-05-2009 | By : Health Promotion | In : Health Tips

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Health Tip – Audio Version speaker iconBig shots
Health Tip – Healthy Next StepVaricella (Chickenpox) Vaccination (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

In getting their kids vaccinated, American parents are big shots. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says we’ve reached 90 percent of kids getting their chicken pox vaccinations, which is a record.

Overall, vaccination rates for children under 3 years continue at a record high of 77 percent. And this includes big increases in American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Those good numbers from the National Immunization Survey still leave some room for improvement, though. The CDC’s Dr. Anne Schuchat notes that coverage isn’t even – some states lead and others lag.

“It takes their parents, their providers, and their public health programs, all working together, to ensure that they’re vaccinated and protected against these serious infectious diseases.’’

Health Tip courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Last revised: September, 30 2008

HEALTH TIPS: More bone

Posted on : 27-05-2009 | By : Health Promotion | In : Health Tips

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Health Tip – Audio Version speaker iconMore bone
Health Tip – Healthy Next StepKids and Their Bones: A Guide for Parents (National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)

Strong bones and dairy foods seem to go together. A researcher says kids who have at least two servings a day of dairy foods starting in childhood had stronger bones as teenagers.

Lynn Moore of Boston University School of Medicine based that on 12 years of records of what kids ate, starting at the age of 3 to 5. The study, which was supported by the National Institutes of Health, was in the Journal of Pediatrics.

“Their bone mass was greater in a large variety of areas, including their arms and legs, and the trunk area, and the ribs and pelvis.’’

Moore says the study underlines the value of low-fat milk, cheese and other dairy foods as a normal part of what kids eat. But she says too few kids eat enough dairy.

Health Tip courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Last revised: October, 01 2008

HEALTH TIPS: Their friends’ thoughts

Posted on : 27-05-2009 | By : Health Promotion | In : Health Tips

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Health Tip – Audio Version speaker iconTheir friends’ thoughts
Health Tip – Healthy Next StepFitness (Office on Women’s Health)

The peers with whom a teenage girl identifies can affect how the girl deals with weight.

Eleanor Mackey of Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., examined survey data on teenage girls’ feelings about weight, and with the peer group with which they identified.

Girls who identified most with athletes were least worried about weight. Mackey suspects they may control weight through exercise and may prefer to look more toned. Girls who identified with nonconformists were more likely to be trying to lose weight and were concerned about their appearance.

“Instead of focusing on weight or appearance, really focus instead on health, and maintaining healthy behaviors.’’

The research in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence was supported by the National Institutes of Health.

Health Tip courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Last revised: October, 02 2008

HEALTH TIPS: Pet the bunny? Wash your hands

Posted on : 25-05-2009 | By : Health Promotion | In : Health Tips

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Health Tip – Audio Version - Pet the bunny? Wash your hands
Health Tip – Healthy Next Step:Healthy Pets Healthy People (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

The animals in the petting zoo are cute. What’s not cute are the germs on those little animals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that, over the past decade, there have been more cases of infectious diseases from animal exhibits.

CDC’s Casey Barton Behravesh says part of the problem is hand to mouth infection. Hands that pet animals or touch animal areas can pick up germs like E. coli, which can cause serious infections. So she says those hands need to be washed:

“Hands should be washed with soap and water right after visiting the animal area, even if you did not touch an animal. Scrub your hands vigorously for about the time it takes to sing the happy birthday song twice.”

And use enough soap and water to make lots of bubbles.

Health Tip courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Last revised: August, 20 2007

HEALTH TIPS: Kids with diabetes

Posted on : 25-05-2009 | By : Health Promotion | In : Health Tips

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Health Tip – Audio Version - Kids with diabetes
Health Tip – Healthy Next Step:Overview of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents (National Diabetes Education Program)

A study says close to 19,000 children are diagnosed each year with diabetes. Most cases are type 1, when the body can’t make enough insulin. The rest are type 2, when the body can’t properly use insulin.

The report says type 1 is especially common among non-Hispanic white youngsters. Type 2 is frequent among minority adolescents.

Dr. Dana Dabelea of the University of Colorado School of Medicine:

“Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult-onset diabetes, and did not used to occur in children. However, we are now seeing type 2 diabetes at younger and younger ages.’’

Proper eating and regular exercise can help to prevent it.

The study in the Journal of the American Medical Association was supported by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Health Tip courtesy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Last revised: August, 21 2007